Volume 7, Issue 1, March 2019, Page: 20-25
Effect of Running Environment and Slope Gradient on Lower Limb Muscle Activation
Theodoros Roussos, Laboratory for the Research of Musculoskeletal System, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Athanasia Smirniotou, School of Physical Education and Sport Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Anastasios Philippou, Department of Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Antonis Galanos, Laboratory for the Research of Musculoskeletal System, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Ioannis Triantafyllopoulos, Laboratory for the Research of Musculoskeletal System, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Received: Feb. 23, 2019;       Accepted: Mar. 30, 2019;       Published: Apr. 18, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajss.20190701.14      View  110      Downloads  33
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess whether the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lower limb muscles - rectus femoris, vastus medialis, bicep femoris and gastrocnemius - during running is affected by different running environments and varied slope gradients. Data collected from this study would be useful for specific training programs adopted from different style runners. Ten male recreational runners participated in the current study. Each of the ten participants, was assessed in two different running conditions, treadmill running and over-ground running, which was consisted of a 20m distance running at a velocity of 11±1km/h at each of the following slope gradients -8%, -4%, 0%, 4%, 8% - in a randomized order. Findings revealed that when over-ground running EMG activity of the lower limb muscles was 16.54% higher compared to treadmill running. Treadmill running is characterized by reduced metabolic cost, which is related to lower muscle activation requirements. Varied slope gradients found to affect muscle activation. During uphill running, lower limb muscle activation was significantly higher compared to level and downhill running, independently of running environment. However, running at negative slope gradients was associated with significantly greater muscle activation compared to level running, only on the treadmill condition.
Keywords
Electromyographic Activity, Overground Running, Treadmill Running, Slope Gradient
To cite this article
Theodoros Roussos, Athanasia Smirniotou, Anastasios Philippou, Antonis Galanos, Ioannis Triantafyllopoulos, Effect of Running Environment and Slope Gradient on Lower Limb Muscle Activation, American Journal of Sports Science. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, pp. 20-25. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20190701.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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