Volume 6, Issue 4, December 2018, Page: 137-143
Circuit Weight Training on Stable and Unstable Surfaces: Differences in Energy Cost, Blood Lactate and Rate of Perceived Exertion
Liliane Cunha Aranda, Department of Sports, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil
Jeferson Macedo Vianna, Department of Sports, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil
Elder Sousa Dutra, Department of Sports, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil
Francisco Zacaron Werneck, Studies and Research Laboratory of Exercise and Sport - Sports Centre, Federal University of Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, Brazil
Jefferson da Silva Novaes, Department of Sports, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil
Jorge Roberto Perrout de Lima, Department of Sports, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil
Victor Manuel Machado de Ribeiro dos Reis, Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences & Human Development, Vila Real, Portugal
Received: Aug. 11, 2018;       Accepted: Aug. 30, 2018;       Published: Oct. 11, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajss.20180604.12      View  299      Downloads  40
Abstract
Unstable surfaces have been used in resistance training, but there are no studies that compared energy cost between stable and unstable surfaces in circuit weight training. This study compared energy cost, post-exercise peak blood lactate and perceived exertion rate between stable surface and unstable surface. Twenty healthy men (24.65 ± 3.48 years, 1.79 ± 0.08 m, 80.61 ± 9.14 kg and 11.86 ± 3.49% body fat) participated in the study. Test and retest of 15 maximum repetitions were performed on stable and unstable surfaces to define workload. The circuit weight training consisted of one set of 15 repetitions at 80% of 15 maximum repetitions in bench press, back squat, rowing bent prone, dead-lift, shoulder press, elbow extension and elbow flexion. Energy cost was measured by indirect calorimetry during and post-circuit weight training. Peak blood lactate and perceived exertion rate were measured post-exercise. Total energy cost was higher on unstable surface compared to stable surface (70.7 ± 10.0 vs. 66.6 ± 7.8 kcal; p = 0.01), as was perceived exertion rate (8.1 ± 0.9 vs. 7.6 ± 1.3; p = 0.02). However, peak blood lactate was higher on stable than unstable surfaces (13.6 ± 2.6 vs. 12.5 ± 1.9 mmol·L−1; p = 0.05). In conclusion, circuit weight training on unstable surfaces can be performed with less weight in comparison to stable surfaces, thereby lowering mechanical stress on joints and bones, while still providing a higher metabolic impact.
Keywords
Circuit Method, Resistance Training, Energy Expenditure
To cite this article
Liliane Cunha Aranda, Jeferson Macedo Vianna, Elder Sousa Dutra, Francisco Zacaron Werneck, Jefferson da Silva Novaes, Jorge Roberto Perrout de Lima, Victor Manuel Machado de Ribeiro dos Reis, Circuit Weight Training on Stable and Unstable Surfaces: Differences in Energy Cost, Blood Lactate and Rate of Perceived Exertion, American Journal of Sports Science. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2018, pp. 137-143. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20180604.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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