Volume 6, Issue 3, September 2018, Page: 88-97
Selective Antecedents of Competitive State Anxiety Dimensions During High Stakes in Elite Competition
Hagan Junior John Elvis, Neurocognition and Action - Biomechanics" - Research Group, Faculty of Psychology and Sport Sciences, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany; Center of Excellence "Cognitive Interaction Technology" CITEC, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany
Pollmann Dietmar, Neurocognition and Action - Biomechanics" - Research Group, Faculty of Psychology and Sport Sciences, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany
Schack Thomas, Neurocognition and Action - Biomechanics" - Research Group, Faculty of Psychology and Sport Sciences, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany; Center of Excellence "Cognitive Interaction Technology" CITEC, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany
Received: Apr. 24, 2018;       Accepted: May 10, 2018;       Published: May 28, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajss.20180603.14      View  810      Downloads  40
Abstract
This present study investigated the influence of competitive state anxiety antecedents on the intensity, direction, and frequency dimensions of elite athletes during high stakes in table tennis competition. Thirty-three (N= 33) purposively sampled elite table tennis players from Ghana completed the modified version of the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2, incorporating the direction and frequency of intrusion subscales during breaks within competitive matches. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses on intensity dimension revealed that cognitive anxiety was significantly predicted by only the age factor while no predictors emerged for somatic anxiety. Self-confidence was significantly predicted by only competitive experience. For directional dimension, gender and age emerged as significant predictors of cognitive anxiety. However, none of the factors were found to significantly predict somatic anxiety and self-confidence. Regarding frequency dimension, cognitive anxiety was significantly related to competitive experience and age whereas no predictors emerged for somatic anxiety. Competitive experience factor was also significantly associated with self-confidence. Findings underscore the need to measure these anxiety dimensions concurrently because they are triggered by different antecedents. Psychological skills interventions should be idiosyncratic based, targeting more self-confidence management strategies in alleviating the effect of cognitive anxiety during competitive matches when demands are very high.
Keywords
Self-Confidence, Intensity, Direction, Frequency, State Anxiety
To cite this article
Hagan Junior John Elvis, Pollmann Dietmar, Schack Thomas, Selective Antecedents of Competitive State Anxiety Dimensions During High Stakes in Elite Competition, American Journal of Sports Science. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2018, pp. 88-97. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20180603.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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