Volume 2, Issue 4, July 2014, Page: 77-86
An Assessment of the Hydration Status of Recreational Endurance Athletes During Mountain Marathon Events
Elizabeth Mahon, Faculty of Education, Health and Community, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Allan Hackett, Faculty of Education, Health and Community, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Timothy Stott, Faculty of Education, Health and Community, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Keith George, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Ian Davies, Faculty of Education, Health and Community, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Received: Jul. 4, 2014;       Accepted: Jul. 16, 2014;       Published: Jul. 30, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajss.20140204.12      View  3282      Downloads  178
Abstract
Changes in hydration status have been shown to have deleterious effects on physiological functioning, physical performance, mental decision making, and subjective sensation of effort. This exploratory study assessed the hydration status of athletes taking part in mountain marathon events and the implications on performance, cognition and well-being markers. Twenty-nine male recreational athletes from the Original Mountain Marathon (OMM) and nineteen from the Longmynd Hike (LH) provided urine samples before, at mid-point (in the OMM) and after the events. Body mass; reaction time tests; and subjective ratings of well-being and effort were also collected/performed at these time points. Post-urine specific gravity (Usg) values [(OMM: 1.023 (range: 1.008 – 1.038) g/ml; LH: 1.024 (range: 1.014 – 1.035) g/ml] were significantly higher than pre-values [(OMM: 1.013 (range: 1.002 – 1.026) g/ml; LH: 1.013 (range: 1.002 – 1.026) g/ml] in both events (p < 0.01), but there was no significant change from mid- to post-event in the OMM (p > 0.05). There was no association between hydration status and overall performance in the LH, whilst change in Usg from pre- to mid-event was positively associated with performance in the OMM (r = .561, p = 0.004). Whilst no associations were observed between hydration status and reaction time, rate of perceived exertion and subjective ratings of nausea showed positive associations with Usg. These findings suggest that although changes in hydration status of this level may not significantly affect performance, they can impact on participant sensations of effort and well-being.
Keywords
Fluid, Exercise, Cognition, Running, Hill-Walking
To cite this article
Elizabeth Mahon, Allan Hackett, Timothy Stott, Keith George, Ian Davies, An Assessment of the Hydration Status of Recreational Endurance Athletes During Mountain Marathon Events, American Journal of Sports Science. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2014, pp. 77-86. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20140204.12
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