Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2014, Page: 48-52
Match Participations, Field Position, Length of Team Membership: Their Impact on Team Cohesion
Gioldasis Aristotelis, Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, National Kapodistrian University of Athens
Stavrou Nektarios, Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, National Kapodistrian University of Athens
Sotiropoulos Aristomenis, Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, National Kapodistrian University of Athens
Psychountaki Maria, Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, National Kapodistrian University of Athens
Received: Mar. 25, 2014;       Accepted: Apr. 8, 2014;       Published: Apr. 10, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajss.20140202.17      View  2959      Downloads  117
Abstract
The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between cohesion and its antecedents (match participations, field position and length of team membership). 173 players of Greek amateur leagues participated in the study. They completed the Greek version of the 18-item Group Environment Questionnaire, and also improvised scales for the other variables in the end of the season 2009-2010. The Cronbach alphas of the Group Environment Questionnaire were satisfied for both task and social cohesion. The MANOVA analyses indicated the existence of statistical significant differences on perceptions of cohesion among players with different number of participations, and length of team membership. However, the MANOVA analysis showed that there were not statistical significant differences on perceptions of cohesion among players of different field position. Specifically, players with less participations perceived lower task and social cohesion than players with more participations. Furthermore, players who were members of their team for shorter period perceived lower social cohesion and higher task cohesion than players who were members for longer. Although the no significant results regarding the relationship between cohesion and field position, some trends showed that goalkeepers and attackers perceived the highest cohesion.
Keywords
Cohesion, Soccer, Position, Status, Performance
To cite this article
Gioldasis Aristotelis, Stavrou Nektarios, Sotiropoulos Aristomenis, Psychountaki Maria, Match Participations, Field Position, Length of Team Membership: Their Impact on Team Cohesion, American Journal of Sports Science. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, pp. 48-52. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20140202.17
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