Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2014, Page: 17-22
The Effect of Vestibular Stimulation on Eye-Hand Coordination and Postural Control in Elite Basketball Players
William W. N. Tsang, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Shirley S. M. Fong, Institute of Human Performance, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Yoyo T. Y. Cheng, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong;Institute of Child Health, University College London, UK
Dinisha D. Daswani, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Hiu Yan Lau, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Carina K. Y. Lun, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Shamay S. M. Ng, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Received: Jan. 9, 2014;       Published: Feb. 28, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajss.20140202.12      View  3571      Downloads  235
Abstract
The game of basketball requires complex eye-hand coordination and exceptional postural control ability. This study compared eye-hand coordination and postural control before and after vestibular stimulation in trained basketball players with healthy, age-matched controls. Fifteen trained basketball players and 17 healthy adults (all male, age range 19-25 years) were recruited. The participants were required to perform a fast finger-pointing task involving a moving visual target in a standing position, before and after whole head-and-body rotation at 150ºs-1 for 30 s seated in a rotational chair. Results show that the trained basketball players had shorter reaction times in eye-hand coordination tasks (a decrease of 23.3% vs an increase of 8.1% of controls, p=0.008) and regained postural control more quickly (mediolateral direction: 0.4% vs 43.3%; p=0.009; anteroposterior direction: 3.9% vs 21.5%, p=0.038) after vestibular stimulation. These data suggest that vestibular stimulation could enhance balance and eye-hand coordination among young basketball players. The findings may provide information for sports training and further research work.
Keywords
Eye-Hand Coordination, Postural Control, Vestibular Stimulation, Basketball
To cite this article
William W. N. Tsang, Shirley S. M. Fong, Yoyo T. Y. Cheng, Dinisha D. Daswani, Hiu Yan Lau, Carina K. Y. Lun, Shamay S. M. Ng, The Effect of Vestibular Stimulation on Eye-Hand Coordination and Postural Control in Elite Basketball Players, American Journal of Sports Science. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, pp. 17-22. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20140202.12
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